Love

Love

Four simple letters put together to make up man’s greatest strength and weakness. What is it? Is it how one feels when they’re around a certain someone? If it is, then why does one loosely use the term when describing things and places that one associates pleasurable memories with? Are both feelings the same? Must one diminish the power of the word to bring it down to a level that one can identify with? 

I don’t know what love is? I say I love my family because that seems appropriate. To me, it is a sense of duty and an agreement between people who are bonded by blood. So, what of ‘falling in love’? It is easy to confuse love with lust, again an association of pleasure that convinces us that this is what love must be. Is it not simply an arrangement between two people, to care, to provide, to share, and to be intimate? 

Deranged poets and writers who desperately wanted to believe in something more than their mundane lives and minds concocted the concept to make life bearable. The belief that people can love unconditionally with sacrifice playing the main theme in the story. 

The naivety of mankind is surprisingly found in the obvious. The propaganda that surrounds this concept is far-reaching and fiction that is narrated once over becomes a fact. An untruth that is now the strongest word in the dictionary, all thanks to the greatest writers, poets, and painters who went through ineffable pains to capture what love should mean to the common man. And it’s worked because it has left mankind with an indelible impression of this loosely sealed word. A time bomb that is waiting to go off, the slow tick reminiscent of gleeful moments that represented the magical four-letter word. 


Nia Tilley
Nia Tilley

A voracious reader and travel addict, Nia writes engrossing poetry and short stories.

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